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ehmeegee:

I despise this urge for competition, one-upmanship, living our lives as if they are a race to reach the finish line first and with the greatest accolades. It dictates our push forward, our motivation for betterment, rather than allowing those initiatives of self-improvement to be driven from an internal force willing us to invest holistically into the ideal of wanting to be the best person we, personally, can be. It creates a struggle - floundering to keep up, flailing in our work to capitalize on the next big thing. What happened to the slow burbling creek, content with “eventually”? Eventually we will get there, a winding path meandering in its journey, sailing along on the winds at a reasonable pace, taking time to smell the roses. I feel a pressure to have it all, be the best, while the rest of me wants to step back and take time to just enjoy the view. 

ehmeegee:

I despise this urge for competition, one-upmanship, living our lives as if they are a race to reach the finish line first and with the greatest accolades. It dictates our push forward, our motivation for betterment, rather than allowing those initiatives of self-improvement to be driven from an internal force willing us to invest holistically into the ideal of wanting to be the best person we, personally, can be. It creates a struggle - floundering to keep up, flailing in our work to capitalize on the next big thing. What happened to the slow burbling creek, content with “eventually”? Eventually we will get there, a winding path meandering in its journey, sailing along on the winds at a reasonable pace, taking time to smell the roses. I feel a pressure to have it allbe the best, while the rest of me wants to step back and take time to just enjoy the view. 

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This week’s #CetaceanSaturday: The pygmy sperm whale (kogia breviceps). They are not often spotted at sea, but their range covers the entire temperate and tropical ranges of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. (at Harvard Museum of Natural History)

This week’s #CetaceanSaturday: The pygmy sperm whale (kogia breviceps). They are not often spotted at sea, but their range covers the entire temperate and tropical ranges of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. (at Harvard Museum of Natural History)

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"Part of the resistance to Darwin and Wallace derives from our difficulty in imagining the passage of the millennia, much less the aeons. What does seventy million years mean to beings who live only one-millionth as long? We are like butterflies who flutter for a day and think it is forever."

Carl Sagan, Cosmos (via whats-out-there)

Let’s take time to smell the flowers, okay fellow butterflies?

(via jtotheizzoe)

(via jtotheizzoe)

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chrisburkard:

“The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.” – G.K. Chesterton

chrisburkard:

“The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.” – G.K. Chesterton

(via polerstuff)

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thebrainscoop:

Dimetrodon is #notadinosaur

I spent my Saturday perusing a nearby toy store and photographing instances in which Dimetrodon and other early Permian (298-295mya) lifeforms are depicted alongside dinosaurs (231-201mya). It’s research for an upcoming episode on The Brain Scoop (or so I tell myself). 

Dimetrodon is a genus of extinct early synapsid, and as such were some of of the earliest of their kind to be attributed with a few key characteristics of mammalian classification. That makes them ancient mammal relatives. In other words, we’re are all synapsids, too. Occasionally, Dimetrodon and co. are referred to as “mammal-like reptiles,” but this, too, is a misnomer, as they weren’t reptiles at all. In fact, humans are more closely related to Dimetrodon than Dimetrodon is related to any reptile, including dinosaurs. 

So, who cares? Why should we be bothered that toy and book companies aren’t adequately researching their imagery before capitalizing on the market appeal of dinosaurs? Does this do any harm other than annoy those of us who would prefer that our consumables be scientifically or historically accurate?

I think we’re subtly cheating ourselves, and subsequently our children, out of being able to appreciate the diversity of evolved life by clumping extinct species into easy-to-label but unrelated groups and relying on people literally buying into ill-informed products. Dimetrodon is other worldly, ancient, captivating - but so were a million other early synapsids, very few of which make it into the coloring books. The Permian was a time of abundant diversity and we owe it to our natural curiosities to explore our collective past. Doing so may grant us a greater appreciation for how we’re here today.

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spaceandstuffidk:

this is perfect.

This.

spaceandstuffidk:

this is perfect.

This.

(Source: max-peck, via drkrislynn)

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(Source: textsfromtng)

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thestolencaryatid:

pushinghoopswithsticks:

Part of the holiday tradition of complaints designed to distinguish yourself from the kind of Americans that might watch a reality tv show uninornically or worse–be the type to appear on one–is the repulsed condemnation of Black Friday. But…

(via rs620)